Why men take testosterone

Because all of our hormones are raging during puberty, androgenetic alopecia can begin as early as a person’s teens, and risk increases with age. By age 35, approximately two-thirds of men will have lost at least a little hair, and by 50, about 85 percent have said goodbye or experienced hair thinning, according to the American Hair Loss Association . In women, the condition can also develop early but usually occurs after menopause — this effect isn’t caused by higher testosterone levels, but rather a sharp drop in other hormone levels. And while men typically lose their hair in a defined pattern — think a widow’s peak and a bald crown — women lose hair and experience thinning all over, although they never fully go bald.  

So, how does one ensure that testosterone levels remain in balance? Some doctors suggest that monitoring testosterone levels every five years, starting at age 35, is a reasonable strategy to follow. If the testosterone level falls too low or if the individual has the signs and symptoms of low testosterone levels described above, testosterone therapy can be considered. However, once testosterone therapy is initiated, testosterone levels should be closely monitored to make sure that the testosterone level does not become too high, as this may cause stress on the individual, and high testosterone levels may result in some of the negative problems (described previously) seen.

Why men take testosterone

why men take testosterone

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